Triangulum

Author: Vladyslav

Joint SCC1 meeting in Lisbon: New manifesto signed

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On 12 April 2018, Triangulum and the representatives of the other eleven Horizon 2020 SCC1 smart city projects met in Lisbon during the Portugal Smart City Summit to sign a manifesto of cooperation. The manifesto is an agreement between cities to significantly change the smart city market place. The signing took place during a day full of workshops where the 76 cities from all over Europe discussed their progress in enhancing energy efficiency and collaborating with the private sector to create models for doing business that will perpetuate and multiply the effects of the EU’s investment.

(Picture: Steinbeis-Europa-Zentrum)

In one such model, companies are fronting the money for green developments, asserting their social responsibility, and recouping investment from energy savings that accrue from systems that are more efficient. By fitting old buildings with better insulation, solar panels and management systems that give residents more control over their energy use, cities can slash their CO2 outputs. The money saved then pays for the initial investment, plus an attractive return. Projects that pilot these and other business models create precedents that can then be employed across Europe to benefit the economy, the cities and their citizens.

Just as shops buy food at one price and sell it at another, there are different price potentials for smart city solutions. ‘Packaging’ means agreeing on a set of standards, for example when building smart lampposts, that are sufficiently generic for one product, or model, to be employed in many cities – while still allowing for personalisation. During one of the Lisbon workshops, cities worked to find the common ground upon which they could find easy-to-build solutions with a clear value proposition, at once component-based and interoperable at an affordable price. Packaging is a tool which cities can employ to cut costs so that residents can enjoy a better future with a lower price tag. Through European funded projects, cities become laboratories where innovative ideas like these are tested, and when projects collaborate and share their results, effective solutions can be replicated, and common barriers can be identified and overcome.

The projects’ communication leaders and coordinators attended a branding workshop designed to help create a coherent brand for the Lighthouse Cities. Having a common brand helps to secure a legacy of the Lighthouse projects’ results by speaking with one voice to the outside world such as investors, suppliers, the broad public, etc. Based on intensive brainstorming and great discussions, the branding workshop worked out five key areas that the twelve SCC1 projects should act on in order to deliver better results, such as working pro-actively with large counter parties (big suppliers, banks, or even the EC), engaging with other (also non-European) cities to inspire replication and to encourage application as future Lighthouse Cities or developing a long-term plan for the SCC1 impact.

(Picture: Fraunhofer IAO)

After intensive thinking and collaborative working, a study visit to the historic Lisbon city hall inspired city leaders by showing how heritage buildings can be protected while at the same time improving energy ratings: The Lisbon city hall is a 150 year old historic building that has been fitted with 100 solar panels (during office hours!), insulated glass, a charging station for electric vehicles and a computerised sustainable energy management system hooked up to its LED lights.
At the Sharing Cities Shop right across from the Lisbon city hall, visitors heard how the Royal Borough of Greenwich, London, which is one of the Sharing Cities Lighthouse Cities, had come up against heritage regulations that made it impossible to install solar panels in the World Heritage Site on the banks of the river Thames. The solution? Focus instead on renewable energy – a Water Source Heat Pump, using water from the Thames basin – that will not change the outward appearance of the buildings and in fact take advantage of the resources of the Heritage Site. Innovative solutions like this are at the heart of smart cities, and by using EU funds to implement them, data from test cases provides proven results that convince other cities that change is possible.

(Picture: Fraunhofer IAO)

By cross-referencing results and conclusions regarding the approach and execution of smart measures, cities boost each other’s potential for success. The demonstration and highlighting of new, tested practices encourages replication in other cities, and allows synergies between projects to emerge. When cities come together and share these result, a lot of false starts and potholes that waste money and resources while slowing down the journey to a sustainable Europe can be avoided.

In the manifesto, the Lighthouse projects therefore declared to commit to identifying opportunities and enhance impact through collaboration. Consequently, synergies will be achieved that will help to spread best practices and thus bring Europe closer to realising its climate commitments. Moreover, the Lighthouse Cities commit to continue collaboration and consultation with businesses and citizens through their Lighthouse collaboration and work together with SCIS and the EIP-SCC to develop tools and standards that can be exploited by cities outside the Lighthouse projects.

Highlights of the “Every Thing is Connected” event, Manchester March 2018

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From 20-22 March 2018, Manchester welcomed over 300 delegates from 12 countries to three days of showcasing Manchester’s smart city activities. On day 1, the URBACT III project SmartImpact, led by Manchester City Council, shared their outcomes with keynotes and workshops. Resources can be found at their project website. On day 2, participants saw CityVerveand Triangulum ‘in action’, with demonstrations of various applications developed in relation to the themes of energy, environment, health and social care and culture. Day 3, hosted by Future Everything, brought together academics, innovators and thinkers to consider issues raised by a data driven society.

(Picture: Every Thing is Connected)

Triangulum offered the chance to test an electric cargo bike and discuss with Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Manchester the advantages of electric vehicles in an Estate Fleet.  Both the cargo bicycles and the vehicles have telematics systems installed, which then feed journey data directly via an API into the Manchester Triangulum data platform Manchester-I.

(Picture: Triangulum Manchester)

Visitors also toured Manchester Metropolitan University’s Birley Campus Energy Centre for an introduction to a wide variety of the Triangulum energy interventions such as solar PV panels, electrical Energy Storage capacity, an innovative Demand Side Response platform and a Siemens Microgrid controller. Visitors also learned how these combine with the existing Combined Heat and Power plant and private heat and power network of the campus. Overall, it was a very successful event with lots of new ideas and exchanges!

Triangulum was meeting in Eindhoven and Lisbon

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Triangulum Consortium (Picture: Fraunhofer IAO)

Last week has been a productive and exciting week for Triangulum. Starting in Eindhoven, one of our three Lighthouse Cities and ending in Lisbon, one of SharingCities’ Lighthouse Cities, we bring home lots of new and smart ideas, new experiences and of course, new memories.

But let’s start from the beginning and follow us through the week:

  • Tuesday: Eindhoven
    • Steering Committee Project Meeting
    • Eindhoven Site Visits: Strijp S and Eckart Vaartbroek
    • iCity Tender Event
  • Wednesday: Eindhoven
    • Review Meeting with PO Manuela Conconi
  • Thursday: Lisbon
    • Portugal Smart Cities Summit: Sharing Cities project conference
    • 3 SCC1 workshops on branding, smart lighting and building retrofit
    • Lisbon Site Visit: City Hall and Sharing Cities Shop
  • Friday: Lisbon
    • Board of Coordinators meeting

During the Eindhoven site visits, we learned that the former Phillips industrial complex Strijp S has now been transformed into a smart district full of smart offices, smart lighting, sustainable energy supply and much more. For example, a district-wide ICT solution allows its residents to reserve an e-vehicle and to check available parking spaces from their desks. There even is a selfie spot right in the middle of the streets of Strijp S! During the iCity tender event, we learned about various innovative projects, such as BitSensors or Abby Bikes. The review meeting on Wednesday was filled with interesting presentations and productive discussions.

i-City Tender (Picture: Steinbeis-Europa-Zentrum)

Moving to Lisbon, all SCC1 projects met at the Portugal Smart Cities Summit where SharingCities organized a side event for the SCC1 community. We listened to presentations by Jens Bartholmes, DG ENER policy officer at the European Union, and learned about the added value of the EIP-SCC and SCIS. In three work-intensive and very productive workshops, project coordinators, communication and replication representatives and many more put their heads together to think of new ways on how to improve and get the most out of the SCC1 collaboration that has started in 2016 so that cities will continue their pathes into a smart future. This day of joint events was topped off with site visits to the Lisbon city hall, where lots of energy saving renovations have been and are still taking place, and to the SharingCities shop right in the middle of the Lisbon city centre, where the change that has been happening within the city thanks to H2020 is showcased in order to really involve the citizens.

Finally, Friday morning, the 12 SCC1 project coordinators met to discuss joint activities and experiences. You see, there is a lot you can do and achieve in one week. If you want to read more about the single events, learn about the findings of the joint workshops or are really interested in what the SharingCities shop has to offer, stay tuned and be excited for the next Triangulum newsletter, to be released at the beginning of May.

SCC1 project coordinators (Picture: Steinbeis-Europa-Zentrum)

Manchester’s first Triangulum ‘Innovation Challenge’

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In February, Manchester partners Clicks and Links, Manchester Metropolitan University (ManMet) and Manchester City Council (MCC) welcomed participants to the first Triangulum ‘Innovation Challenge’.
Over the course of half a day, proposals for energy saving measures were prepared, which could be taken across the ManMet Birley campus and beyond.

The challenge also involved reviewing Clicks and Links’ ‘Beat the Peak’ Application; created for ManMet to allow them to promote and monitor energy savings the students are making. This ‘softer’ activity will complement the Triangulum Central Controller trials also taking place at ManMet, where Demand Side Response and local distribution charges (DuoS) scenarios are being tested.

The participants delivered a series of well received pitches to judges from the partner organisations, and the best ideas won prizes donated by Corridor Manchester.

(Picture: Triangulum Manchester)

“Every Thing is Connected” in Manchester from 20 – 22 March 2018

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(Picture: Every Thing is Connected)

Every Thing is Connected in our Lighthouse City Manchester: three days of events revolving around the theme of Smart Cities, from 20th – 22nd March, 2018.

At this exciting “conference-as-lab” event, Triangulum as well as other local and international Smart City projects will explore how the Internet of Things is connected in a Smart City landscape. They will gather to demonstrate, discuss, network and, of course, inspire!

Day 1 is a day of presentations and workshops focusing on the findings of the SmartImpact project led by the Manchester City Council.

SmartImpact is a European Commission funded network of 10 European cities. The focus of the project is promoting smart, sustainable urban development, creating liveable cities. The event is a great chance to learn about the real world challenges and opportunities of becoming a Smart City.

Day 2: Experience a Smart City!

The projects will explore Manchester as a Smart City with hands-on workshops, field visits, demonstrations, and deep dives across the Oxford Road Corridor area. Best practices and use cases developed within CityVerve and Triangulum will be showcased. The day’s themes will cover health, transport, energy, culture and public realm.

Day 3 is a day of conference and art events created by FutureEverything, featuring discussions, presentations and workshops.

As computing dissolves into the everyday, we find ourselves surrounded by millions of connected, intelligent objects. Scattered throughout the city, a bin, lamppost or coffee cup can be a computing device, a sensor or actuator. Invisible agents monitor and influence our lives, largely unexamined and unchecked.
Registration is by invitation only.

Cities Get Smart with Funding – Follower City Event in Brussels

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Brussels, BE: On 26 January 2018 representatives of 40 cities sat around the table at the Innovation and Networks Executive Agency (INEA) with industry representatives and experts to ensure that the €263.84 million invested by the Commission through the Horizon 2020 Smart Cities and Communities programme generates returns.

(Picture: Steinbeis-Europa-Zentrum)

The funding provided by the H2020 programme is generating savings by stimulating common solutions to shared challenges, allowing cities to collaborate on design, and even engage in cross-border joint procurement. When cities create scale through demand aggregation they have the power to shape and influence the market.

40 cities making a joint purchase of 1000 electric busses have a lot more power to dictate prices and standards than each city individually seeking to purchase 25 units. Reducing 40 transactions to a single one also means spending only a fraction of the man-hours that would otherwise be needed.

Cities are using these economies of scale to make concrete improvements to residents’ lives. The city of Munich is piloting a ‘virtual power plant’, so that residents can store solar energy generated on their rooftops and use a mobile app to sell it back to the grid during peak demand. This technology is now being put in the hands of EU citizens in many European cities. Funding from the Commission helps cities share these technologies so that they can learn from each other and replicate successful solutions throughout Europe.

In Burgas, ‘smart lamp posts’ use LED bulbs and a reactive dimming system to save over 50% of the energy used for street lighting. This means using less energy, creating less pollution and allowing more money to be spent elsewhere. Sensors installed in the lamp posts also give the city information about noise levels and congestion patterns which can inform further urban developments. This is another idea that is spreading like wildfire across Europe, with the Commission expecting to see 10 million of these lamp posts built by 2025.

Other measures discussed in Friday’s meeting were bike and car sharing, and smart parking; building retrofit; zero emission zones; sustainable logistics; and electric vehicles. The scale of these projects means that cities are becoming more attractive to global investors, as cooperation promises enormous returns and greatly reduced risk.

Through H2020 Smart Cities and Communities, European funds are ensuring that cities cooperate and collaborate to implement solutions more efficiently, more rapidly and more widely. Through 12 projects, 86 cities are working together across national borders to an unprecedented degree, with 36 ‘lighthouse’ cities piloting innovative technologies, and 40 ‘follower’ cities engaging in intensive peer learning activities in order to replicate the solutions being implemented. “Knowledge transfer,” insisted INEA’s Alan Haigh, “will be achieved through the presentation of concrete results.” According to Mr Haigh, “A huge amount of data is now available,” and the remaining challenge is, “how to make it accessible and useful.”

Friday’s meeting was the opportunity for these 40 follower cities to exchange about the hurdles they have encountered so far, so that they can learn from each other to achieve more effective collaboration, leading to larger returns on the programme’s investments.

Building smart cities creates wealth and combats waste through establishing economies of scale, creating greater efficiency within cities, and improving the health of citizens. The WHO estimates that the health impacts of air pollution cost the EU over 1 trillion euro in 2010 alone. If cities can join forces to implement smart solutions, engage in joint procurement, and cut energy costs to create a greener Europe, the Commission’s ½ billion investment will surely be money well spent.

These projects are already producing positive results, and the Commission is fully supportive to build further momentum along this trajectory. Jens Bartholmes, policy officer at the European Commission, invited cities to come forward and share their smart city related plans and needs. The Commission tasked the support team of the European Innovation Partnership for Smart Cities and Communities Marketplace to help with this data collection and based on this overview of real needs will fine-tune its support to European cities.

 

Save the date: Every Thing is Connected event in Manchester from 20 – 22 March 2018

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(Picture: Every Thing is Connected)

Every Thing is Connected – three days of events to share the findings from local and international Smart City projects, among them Triangulum, through hands-on demonstrations, discussions, networking and art installations.

Based at the Bright Building, Manchester Science Park’s brand new state-of-the-art workplace, we will question, experiment and demonstrate how every thing, and everyone, can be connected in an urban landscape.

What’s on:

Smart Impact, Tuesday 20th March 2018
A chance to learn from leading cities about the real world challenges and opportunities of becoming a smart city.

Smart City Live, Wednesday 21st March 2018
Activities, experiments and exhibitions showcasing best practice across CityVerve and Triangulum. Followed by the launch of Future Sessions.

Future Sessions: Trust in invisible agents, Thursday 22nd March 2018
Bringing the creative and unusual centre stage with workshops, presentations and art installations. Includes the exclusive premiere of SUPERGESTURES, the next CityVerve art commission.

Water Industry Award goes to Triangulum project in Stavanger – Stavanger’s Central Energy Plant awarded as first of its kind in Norway

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(Picture: Triangulum Stavanger)

Stavanger’s Central Energy Plant, part of the Lighthouse City’s Triangulum activities, recently won the Water Industry Award in Norway for its innovative solution. The award is handed out to projects with a high degree of complexity, solved by using a new and unique approach.

The energy plant transforms the city’s wastewater to energy, reducing the CO2 emission by 80 % – something that has never been done in Norway before. The new energy facility uses a renewable energy source to heat and cool three administrative buildings and the public swimming pool in the city centre.

Local coordinator in Stavanger, Gerd Seehuus, is happy for the acknowledgment and says it’s great that the City of Stavanger can be up front when it comes to developing sustainable and innovative solutions.

The award is handed out at Norway’s most important conference for people working with water and sewage, The Water Days.

 

 

 

 

Stavanger’s Central Energy Plant, part of the Lighthouse City’s Triangulum activities, recently won the Water Industry Award in Norway for its innovative solution. The award is handed out to projects with a high degree of complexity, solved by using a new and unique approach.

The energy plant transforms the city’s wastewater to energy, reducing the CO2 emission by 80 % – something that has never been done in Norway before. The new energy facility uses a renewable energy source to heat and cool three administrative buildings and the public swimming pool in the city centre.

Local coordinator in Stavanger, Gerd Seehuus, is happy for the acknowledgment and says it’s great that the City of Stavanger can be up front when it comes to developing sustainable and innovative solutions.

The award is handed out at Norway’s most important conference for people working with water and sewage, The Water Days.

Further information on the Central Energy Plant: http://triangulum-project.eu/index.php/2017/08/30/new-energy-facilities-in-stavanger-save-372-tons-of-co2-emissions-per-year/

Further information (in Norwegian):
http://dihva.no/kurs_og_fagtreff/vannbransje_prisen/
https://www.stavanger.kommune.no/nyheter/energisentralen-vant-vannbransjeprisen-2017/

Mayors Meeting in Sabadell – Listen and Learn from best practices within the Triangulum project

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Sabadell’s mayor Maties Serracant invited John Jorritsma, mayor of Eindhoven to speak about experiences and good practices of the Dutch Lighthouse City.

On 14th November, Mayor Serracant and other representatives of Sabadell welcomed a Dutch delegation together with representatives of Follower City Leipzig and Fraunhofer Institute in order to foster replication activities in Sabadell.

The meeting was focusing on the question: Which innovative solutions are applicable for Sabadell to be replicated?  After an intense exchange on innovative solutions, preconditions and challenges, the visitors were taken around on site-visits to gain an impression about the future soft mobility area in the centre of Sabadell. At the end of the day, Eindhoven’s Mayor Jorritsma was impressed by Sabadell’s enthusiasm about the cooperation and the determination to take over proven technologies and methods of Lighthouse City Eindhoven.  In special, under the Triangulum, there are promising opportunities for replication in both cities in the fields of innovative lighting, start-up acceleration, innovative public tenders, parking sensors and city information interactive panels. The meeting was the opportunity for making an explicit commitment of technical and political cooperation of the city of Eindhoven with the local Triangulum strategy in Sabadell, to be implemented as of 2018.

This activity counted on the economic support of the Barcelona provincial council (Diputació de Barcelona), under the framework of the 2017 Service catalogue of the 2016-2019 Local government network.