Triangulum

stavanger

City of Stavanger, Norway

The Stavanger region is the energy capital of Europe; it holds the European status as smart city lighthouse (among only nine cities in Europe) and is the Norwegian Smart Care Cluster on welfare technology. Further, the region has a high level of digital service development and provision, due to its high speed digital infrastructure (more and more commonly 1GB in/out in households).

Eindhoven Triangulum

City of Eindhoven, Netherlands

Eindhoven is the centre of the “Brainport Region”, today one of the three top economic engines of The Netherlands, delivering about 14% of the national GDP. The Dutch consortium consists of five partners: VolkerWessels, Woonbedrijf, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, KPN and the Municipality of Eindhoven.

manchester

City of Manchester, UK

With a total population of 2.6 million People, it accounts for the second largest economy in the UK. Industry sectors such as business services, ICT, digital and biomedical sciences are key to economic growth in Greater Manchester in terms of new investment, job and GVA creation. Manchester is the economic powerhouse of the North West region of England.

Leipzig Triangulum

City of Leipzig, Germany

Leipzig is one of the most dynamic cities in the heart of Germany with approximately 550,000 inhabitants (2014). After years of population decline and an above-average unemployment rate, Leipzig started to regain popularity during the last years and is successfully turning from a post-industrial into a modern, knowledge-based economy.

Prague Triangulum

City of Prague, Czech Republic

Prague is one of the most attractive and successful regions within Central Europe. The combination of its rich cultural and historical heritage and its unique architectural and urbanistic value creates a phenomenon even on a global scale. Prague is the home and everyday living space for approximately 1.27 million inhabitants and concentrates approximately 12% of the Czech population. Prague generates approximately 1/4 of the national GDP and is approximately 50% above the national average in GDP per capita. Major universities and a number of research institutes (2/3 of public research institutions) are to be found in Prague, as well as the majority of businesses active in research and development.

Sabadell Triangulum

City of Sabadell, Spain

Sabadell is a Spanish City of 207,540 inhabitants (2014) and 37.87 km2, located in Catalonia (Spain). It belongs to Barcelona’s Metropolitan Region, where 68% of the Catalan population lives. In 2012 Sabadell pioneered the introduction of a Smart City programme in a structured, comprehensive and systematic approach complementing the implementation of new technologies for urban management. These measures included an increased level of 30% of LED installation in public lighting, of 13% of pneumatic waste collection, a 90% reduction of irrigation of parks and gardens and the implementation of remote management systems of air conditioning in 59 municipal buildings.

Latest News

Triangulum at #SCEWC19

The Smart City Expo World Congress in Barcelona is taking place from 19-21 November 2019.

Triangulum will be there as well, together with the SCIS and EIP-SCC teams and all the other Horizon 2020 European Smart City Lighthouse Projects. Meet us all three days at our joint stand in the exhibition hall 1. Come visit the Smart Cities corner and meet us there! Stand B140.

Moreover, Triangulum invites you to their agora session together with REMOURBAN and GrowSmarter on 19.11. at 9.45 AM in the North Agora: “From dream to reality: Impact of lighthouse projects on cities”

Overview:

Agora Sessions

Tuesday, 19.11., 9.45-10.45 h, Place: North Agora      (–> find Triangulum representatives here!)

“From dream to reality: Impact of lighthouse projects on cities”

The three projects GrowSmarter, Triangulum and REMOURBAN that started as the first three projects in 2014 and are thus ending soon are showcasing the changes and impacts that piloting solutions had on their cities.

Wednesday, 20.11., 15:00-15:45 h, Place: South Agora

“The Journey: from Nearly Zero Energy Neighbourhood to Positive Energy Districts”

The evolution from nZEBs to PEDs, illustrated by project cases from REMOURBAN, mySMARTLife, MAKING-CITY and +CityxChange.

Thursday, 21.11., 10:30-11.15 h, Place: Central Agora   

“Europe 2030: What’s next for Smart Cities and Communities?”

Debate on the future of smart cities and communities, showcasing policy aspects as well as concrete results and packaging approaches for replication and upscaling.

Workshops at the stand

Tuesday, 19.11.

11.00-11:45 Welcome: EIP SCC – The Marketplace

12.00-12.45 SCIS: Live SCIS Self Reporting Tool Helpdesk

13.00-13.45 Smart Public Lighting and IP Services

14.00-14.45 A Mission to Deliver the Cities of the Future

15.00-15.45 EIP SCC – The Marketplace: Action Clusters

16.00-16.45 Nordic Lighthouse Cities – Smart, Bold and Collaborative

Wednesday, 20.11.

10.30-11.00 Replicating Smart Solutions (–> find Triangulum representatives here!)

11.00-11.45 Financing – Let’s Make it Happen

12.00-12:45 Visualising the Smart City

13.00-13.45 Open Urban Data Platforms

14.00-14.45 Spanish Smart Cities

16.00-16.45 Build-up “Open” Eco Systems in Smart City Projects

17.30 – 19.00 Night of EU Smart Cities and Communities

Thursday, 21.11.

10.00-10.30 Scale-up Your SC Solutions through the EU City Facility

12.00-12.45 Impacts Beyond the Projects (–> find Triangulum representatives here!)

14.00-14.45 A Pitch from the Lyon Makers Sessions

14.45 -15.30 SCC1 Projects Stakeholders´Map by MAKING-CITY

Smart city projects share policy recommendations in Brussels

Download policy paper

Download presentation

During the European Week of Regions and Cities, the first three Smart Cities and Communities projects GrowSmarter, Remourban and Triangulum, funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme, hosted the session “From dream to reality: sharing experiences from leading European Smart Cities” at which more than 150 participants took part.

The goal of this joint session was to present major outcomes and to share lessons learnt from five years of smart city projects in different European regions, focusing on technical as well as political aspects of creating smart cities. 

“The European smart cities have come a long way since our projects started five years ago and we have gained a lot of experience. Remourban, Triangulum and GrowSmarter have worked through many of the ‘do’s and don’ts’ of smart cities and gained an understanding of how policies can be changed to support the development of smart and sustainable cities and help meet local and European climate goals,” says Gustaf Landahl, Project Coordinator of GrowSmarter.

High level politicians from five of the Lighthouse Cities discussed what is needed on an EU level to facilitate successful replication in the future. The overall consensus of this panel was that European support is needed to help get local initiatives off the ground.

The coordinators of all three projects demonstrated their main achievements in the areas of energy, mobility and ICT. Lisa Enarsson from the City of Stockholm (GrowSmarter), for example, exemplified that it is indeed possible to reduce energy consumption of a residential building from the 1960s by 80 %  by providing new insulation, four-glass windows as well as smart ventilation and waste water systems. Miguel Ángel García Fuentes, Coordinator for Remourban, spoke on mobility and the work done by the City of Nottingham to implement the largest fleet of electric busses in Europe.  Trinidad Fernandez, our Triangulum Coordinator introduced the vision of Eindhoven to become Europe’s and Netherlands’ Brainport and innovation hub, along with an innovative example of ICT-based home renovation.

Detailed insights on the daily work within the cities have been provided by overall six site managers from the various Lighthouse Cities of the three projects. They presented the biggest successes as well as the hardest failures from their individual demonstration sites. Amongst other achievements, Gerd Seehuus from the City of Stavanger (Triangulum) demonstrated the tremendous energy savings having been achieved through the development of a central energy plant based on 100 % renewable energy that now heats (and cools!) three administrative buildings as well as the city’s public swimming pool and could thus already save over 1000 tons of CO2 since its implementation in 2017.

As a major outcome of this joint session by GrowSmarter, Remourban and Triangulum, the three projects collectively produced a policy paper to summarize the experiences and the knowledge gained within these five years of smart city implementations. The set of policy recommendations builds upon combined lessons learned to support other EU cities in their transition towards smart and sustainable cities and communities.

Links:

Energising Manchester – A Celebration of the work Triangulum in Manchester

Register here

Manchester has set ambitious Zero Carbon 2038 objectives and recently announced a Climate Emergency. Funded from the EC Horizon 2020 programme, over the past five years the Triangulum project has developed, deployed and tested a suite of projects focused on low energy districts, integrated infrastructures and sustainable urban mobility in Manchester to help the city achieve its low carbon goals.

Manchester City Council, Siemens, University of Manchester, Manchester Metropolitan University and SME partner Pixel Mill Digital have worked together to target a series of impacts: reduced energy consumption of buildings, increased use of renewable energies, increased use of electric vehicles, deployment of intelligent energy management technologies and an ICT data hub. Here’s a snapshot:

– Photovoltaic panels and an electrical energy storage solution managed by a microgrid controller at MMU, using energy from the grid when costs are low or from the battery when high.

– An innovative central controller that works alongside the microgrid controller to form a virtual power plant, sharing power across the Oxford Road Corridor between buildings from Manchester City Council and the University of Manchester.

– A new Building Energy Management System (BEMS) has been installed in the city art gallery. The BEMS manages equipment supporting the internal environmental parameters for the exhibition spaces at the gallery.

– A data hub, Manchester-i, collects data from across the city and the Oxford Road Corridor and makes it openly available. This forms an integral part of the new Manchester Urban Observatory, a new £1m facility using IoT sensors to collect data and test urban infrastructure systems in real-world settings.

– Shared electric vehicles for staff at Manchester Metropolitan University

Register here

When: Tuesday, 10 December 2019 from 13:30 to 16:30 (GMT)

Location:
Manchester Art Gallery
Mosley Street Manchester
M2 3JL United Kingdom
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Lighthouse and Follower Cities

Eindhoven

Eindhoven, Netherlands

Eindhoven is the center of the “Brainport Region”. The Dutch Consortium consists of five partners: VolkerWessels, Woonbedrijf, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, KPN and the Municipality of Eindhoven.

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Manchester

Manchester, United Kingdom

The Greater Manchester conurbation with a total population of 2.7 million people accounts for the second largest economy in the UK and the economic powerhouse of the North West region of England.

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Stavanger

Stavanger, Norway

The Stavanger region is the energy capital of Europe; it holds the European status as smart city lighthouse and is the Norwegian Smart Care Cluster on welfare technology.

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Sabadell

Sabadell, Spain

Sabadell is a Spanish City of 207,540 inhabitants, located in Catalonia. It belongs to Barcelona’s Metropolitan Region, where 68% of the Catalan population lives.

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Prague, Czech Republic

Prague is one of the most attractive regions within Central Europe. The combination of its cultural heritage and its architectural value creates a phenomenon.

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Leipzig

Leipzig, Germany

Leipzig is one of the most dynamic cities in Germany. After years of population decline, it is successfully turning from a post-industrial into a knowledge-based economy.

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Tianjin

Tianjin, China (Observer City)

Tianjin is a Chinese metropolitan area. Its economic output is currently twice that of the national average, and infrastructure projects are under development to support this growth.

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